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Research Briefs

Ownership is Key

Ownership is key to engaging customers and employees in environmental and community stewardship

When customers or employees feel a personal connection to a cause or organization, they are more likely to engage in pro-social behaviors such as volunteering and donation efforts.

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CSR linked to innovation

CSR linked to increase in innovation capacity

Firm innovation capacity increases with superior management of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) risk criteria.

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Firms that adopt CSR practices are more likely to continue over time

Strong CSR practices can create a virtuous cycle—regardless of past behavior, once firms have adopted CSR behaviors, there is a decreased likelihood of subsequent irresponsible behavior.

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Voluntary Sustainability Reporting Water

Voluntary sustainability reporting: Key factors that influence water disclosure

Companies’ likelihood of disclosing information about their water management voluntarily is impacted mostly by internal factors, including self-regulation and internal governance measures, and external factors, including operating in a water-intensive industry.

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Research Briefs

The effect of government stability on CSR and financial performance

Firms that have both strong CSR performance and operate in a stable institutional environment—with strong governance and regulation enforcement—enjoy benefits to the bottom line. Firms operating in corrupt environments may also receive financial benefits from strong CSR.

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Research Briefs

Well-treated employees feel more satisfied and connected to their companies

Thinking about how to improve employee well-being? Think first about your employment practices.

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Research Briefs

Strong ESG performance adds value to firms in emerging economies

Positive external ESG ratings and corporate citizenship program assessments correlate to improved financial performance for companies in emerging economies.

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Research Briefs

The consumers most likely to punish companies for controversy—and how to win them back

Following a corporate social or environmental controversy, consumers who are less accepting of inequality are more inclined to perceive a company negatively and not purchase its products—however, issuing both an apology and a plan to remedy the situation can mitigate these negative perceptions.

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Research Briefs

Following new emissions rules, multinational firms show stronger environmental performance

When faced with mandatory carbon reduction regulations, multinational-owned plants had better environmental performance than plants operating only within a domestic market.

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